Reciprocity: Politics—Education

If educational and cultural efforts should advance political and economic life, isn’t the converse also the case: political and economic conduct should advance educational and cultural life?

Proclamations abound: educational effort must serve the needs of nations and economies better than they do. Leaders and the public hotly debate what political and economic interests schools should advance and how they should do it. But let us ask as well:

  • Is this connection between pedagogical and political activity unidirectional or reciprocal?
  • And if reciprocal, what are the responsibilities that need to be met in the conduct of political and economic life to enable a people to realize their full educational and cultural potential?

Please share your views via comments.

About Robbie McClintock

After a long career at Teachers College, Columbia University -- 50 years as a student and teacher -- I have "graduated," as I like to put it. Looking ahead, feeling energetic and well-prepared, I will concentrate on radical scholarship and criticism, work that goes to the root of education, public affairs, and culture. Early in 2012, I published a Utopian critique of schooling and historical life -- Enough: A Pedagogic Speculation. Further essays will follow. Let us speak out against fear mongers, the pundits of public parsimony, and the peddlers of self-serving prudence. We can aspire to more positive possibilities -- constructing historical realities in which humanity achieves elegant, fair, and meaningful solutions to the great uncertainties of our time.
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